Get Adobe ReaderA note about viewing streaming video

 

Special Education Compliance

Early Childhood Special Education

Back to FAQ Home Page

  1. What do state and federal and federal regulations require when determining the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for preschool children with disabilities?

  2. What are the placement options for ECSE students?

  3. How can the LEA meet the federal and state requirements for LRE since all school districts do not make preschool or child care services available to all 3-5 year old children?

  4. If parents have enrolled their child in a preschool or daycare and the IEP team determines that their services will be provided there, does that obligate the district to pay for the preschool/daycare?

  5. How is the IEP team’s decision regarding LRE for ECSE children documented on the IEP?

  6. For students who receive all or part of their services in a district centerbased program, if the district chooses to operate its ECSE program as a cooperative program with other preschool programs such as Title I, MPP, or district-funded preschool, how does this affect placement and documentation of services on the IEP for an ECSE child?

  7. What do we do when a parent has enrolled their child in a preschool or daycare (Early Childhood setting), the IEP team has determined that the child’s special education and related services will be provided in that Early Childhood setting and then the parent decides to remove the child from the preschool/daycare?

  8. Where/how do you document regular education minutes on the IEP?

  9. If an ECSE teacher is monitoring a child in a regular preschool, and the service is consultative, would the minutes be listed as 0?

  10. Do students who have met ECSE eligibility criteria in the past now require a reevaluation to determine eligibility for YCDD or another categorical eligibility?

  11. How are children who have previously been identified under the ECSE criteria reported to DESE for child count purposes?

  12. Can a child go to kindergarten with a YCDD diagnosis?

  13. Can a kindergarten child receive services in ECSE?

  14. When social/emotional behavior is the only area for delay, is a licensed psychologist still required?

  15. Are sensory issues considered under physical or adaptive?

  16. How is the communication area of delay interpreted?

  17. Are we required to test gross motor if the child only has fine motor concerns?

  18. If a student has a 1.5 SD in fine motor and a 1.5 SD in language, do they qualify?

  19. Will the state schools require a categorical diagnosis to accept students?

  20. For First Steps students, do we have to follow the 30-day timeline between diagnosis and IEP if the evaluation is completed well in advance of the third birthday?

  21. Is a regular education teacher required at the initial IEP for children eligible for ECSE services (even speech only)?

  22. Who can serve as the regular education teacher for a child who is eligible for ECSE?

  23. Who determines who will serve as the regular education teacher in the child’s IEP?

  24. What is the role of the regular education teacher in the IEP meeting?

  25. Does a regular education teacher have to be present for every IEP meeting?

  26. If the IEP team has determined that the regular education teacher does not need to be present at an IEP meeting, must that be documented and how/where would that be done?

  27. What is the School Entry Assessment Profile (SEAP) and is ECSE required to complete it?

  28. If districts are not required to administer the SEAP, why does the first performance goal in the Missouri State Plan include SEAP results?

  29. What can ECSE staff do to increase these results for young children with disabilities?

  30. What about collaborative efforts with Head Start?

  31. Why were the ECSE technical assistance bulletins pulled from the WEB?

  32. Will DESE be developing a new ECSE brochure?

  33. Does the Division have plans to update the Show Me How II manual?

  34. How do I obtain information from DESE regarding ECSE as well as other special education topics (data collection, funding, etc.)?

 


 

1.  What do state and federal regulations require when determing the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for preschool children with disabilities?

State and federal regulations require that:

  1. A variety of placement options are available to meet the unique needs of the child (see Question 3.2 below)

  2. Placement is based upon the child’s IEP

  3. Placement is determined by the child’s IEP team

  4. Placement is determined annually

  5. At least annually, the IEP team must consider whether all of the special education and related services can be provided with non-disabled peers in a regular education setting with appropriate supplementary aids & services, accommodations and modifications.

  6. In selecting the LRE, consideration is given to any potential harmful effect on the child or on the quality of services that he or she needs

  7. A child with a disability is not removed from education in age-appropriate regular classrooms solely because of needed modifications in the general curriculum.  For preschool children “regular classroom or “regular education” means settings that are designed primarily for children without disabilities and “general curriculum” refers to age-appropriate activities.

The LRE expectations set forth in IDEA clearly encompass preschool age children as well as children in grades K-12. Special classes, separate schooling or other removal of children with disabilites from the regular education environment should occur only if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes (or for preschool, setting designed primarily for children without disabilities) with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily.

 


 

2.  What are the placement options for ECSE students?

State regulations list several placement options for preschool children.

Early Childhood Setting. Children with disabilities who receive all of their special education and related services in educational programs designed primarily for children without disabilities.  No education or related services are provided in separate special education settings.

Some characteristics/examples of the above setting are:

  • Designed for children without disabilities

  • The special education teacher and or/therapist travel to the child and provide the services in the integrated setting (The child is not pulled from the classroom for the special education and related services.)

    • Daycare (Public or Private [not parochial])

    • Preschool (Public or Private [not parochial])

    • Head start

    • Home/early childhood combinations

    • Etc.

  • May be a collaborative program this is designed for children without disabilities, where the ratio of children without IEPs is equal to or higher than that of children with IEPs.  These classrooms could be team-taught or taught by one teacher who has a split position.  Examples of these combined programs include:

 

    • Title I/ECSE classroom

    • District Early Childhood/ECSE classroom

    • Headstart/ECSE classroom

    • Missouri Preschool Project (MPP)/ECSE classroom

Early Childhood Special Education Setting. Children with disabilities who receive all of their special education and related services in educational programs designed primarily for children with disabilities housed in regular school buildings or other community-based settings.  No special education or related services as designated by an IEP are provided in an early childhood setting.

Some characteristics/examples of this setting are:

  • Designed for children with disabilities

  • Centerbased/self-contained

  • Integrated ECSE (formerly reverse mainstream)

  • Special education classrooms in trailers outside regular school building

Home. Children with disabilities who receive all of their special education and related services in the principal residence of the child’s family or caregivers. 

Some characteristics/examples of this setting are:

  • Child's home

  • Foster home

  • Extended family's home (grandparent, aunt, etc.)

Part Time EC/Part time ECSE setting. Children with disabilities who receive all of their special education and related services in multiple settings, such that: (1) general and/or special education and related services are provided at home or in educational programs designed primarily for children without disabilities AND (2) special education and related services are provided in programs designed primarily for children with disabilities.

Some characteristics/examples of this setting are:

  • Services are provided in two different placements

  • Home  + Itinerant Service Outside the Home

  • Home + ECSE

  • Early Childhood Setting + Itinerant Service Outside the Home

  • Early Childhood Setting + ECSE

Residential Facility. Children with disabilities who receive all of their special education and related services in publicly or privately operated residential schools or residential medical facilities on an inpatient basis. 

Note:  Only use this option when the IEP team has determined that the child needs to be placed in a residential facility in order to receive FAPE, not because the child is already placed in a residential facility by another agency or because the location for the provision of services is located such a distance from the child’s home that residing in the facility is necessary. In those cases, another placement option would be used, such as Home, EC, ECSE, or Separate School. 

Separate School. Children with disabilities who receive all of their special education and related services in educational programs in public or private day schools specifically for children with disabilities.

Itinerant Service Outside the Home. Children with disabilities who receive all of their special education and related services at a school, hospital facility on an outpatient basis, or other location for a short period of time (i.e., no more than 3 hours per week).  These services may be provided individually or to a small group of children.

This placement option would be used in the following instances:

  • The service is being provided at a location other than the child’s home

  • The child comes to the teacher (the service is being provided in a resource or non-school location, not in an integrated classroom setting)

  • The teacher or service provider goes to the child’s preschool/childcare setting, but provides services in a “pull-out” fashion—separating the child from children without disabilities

  • The service is being provided for a short period of time (3 hours or less per week)

  • The service is being provided to an individual child or a small group of children

Examples of this would be:

  • The child is receiving speech only services for 120 minutes per week.  The SLP goes to the child’s preschool, but provides the services one-on-one in a separate room

  • The child is receiving 60 minutes of speech and 120 minutes of OT per week.  For the speech, the child comes to the public school building, but receives the services in a small group in the speech resource room.  For the OT, the child goes to the local hospital’s rehabilitation clinic.

  • The child receives 30 minutes per week of specialized instruction in a small group pull-out setting and 15 minutes consultation is provided to the Early Childhood staff, at the child’s childcare center.

  • The child receives 60 minutes of ECSE teacher services weekly, pullout from Head Start, and 30 minutes consultative services from the SLP in a separate room at the Head Start, monthly with parent and Head Start staff present.

 


 

3. How can the LEA meet the federal and state requirements for LRE since all school districts do not make preschool or child care services available to all 3-5 year old children?

While the options for LEA early care and education programs have been increasing, not all school districts operate regular education preschools or childcare programs.  It was not the intent of the law that schools should be required to initiate those programs solely to satisfy the LRE requirements.  Districts need to be aware of and collaborate with Head Start and other non-parochial community preschool/childcare programs so that whenever appropriate, children can receive their special education and related services in Early Childhood settings.  In many cases children are already attending these settings and special education, related services, supplementary aids and services can appropriately be provided to the child in that location.  LEAs should also engage in ongoing short and long-range planning that leads to effective use of the itinerant/consultative approach to services.  Where district preschool/childcare programs are available, collaboration within the district is important to facilitate the collaboration and cooperation between the regular and special education programs to enhance the options for regular education placements.  Districts can also use Integrated ECSE (Reverse Mainstream) classrooms to provide a higher level of integration than a self contained classroom, however these classrooms are considered special education settings and they should be considered only after considering if an Early Childhood setting is appropriate.

 


 

4. If parents have enrolled their child in a preschool or daycare and the IEP team determines that their services will be provided there, does that obligate the district to pay for the preschool/daycare?

Not necessarily. The school is not obligated to pay tuition for any of the time involving itinerant services (pull out one-on-one or small group or consultation). The school is only obligated to pay tuition for the specific amount of time designated in the IEP for special education, related services and supplementary aids and services that are provided in the integrated setting. 

IEP teams need to carefully consider what special education, related service, supplementary aids, and service modifications and adjustments are necessary to address the IEP goals and objectives. While most people would agree that all children can benefit from pre-school experience, it is not the school’s responsibility to pay for these experiences with state or federal special education funds. These funds cover the cost of specialized instruction (above and beyond the curriculum and individualized instruction provided to all children in the class) related services, supplementary aids and services supports to school personnel, modifications and accommodations required by and documented on the child’s IEP.

 


 

5. How is the IEP team’s decision regarding LRE for ECSE children documented on the IEP? 

There are three places on the IEP that the teams’ decisions regarding LRE are documented.  One is in the section called “Extent of Participation in Regular Education.”  One is in the section on “Placement Considerations and Decisions.” And one is in the Services Summary section when the team identifies the location for provision of services.

(For an example of these sections of the IEP, readers are directed to the State Model IEP on the Division of Special Education website at dese.mo.gov/divspeced/Compliance/index.html#Special Education Process). 

In the “Services Summary” section of the IEP the team will determine, for each service identified, the location where that service will be provided.  This should be more general, rather than specific (e.g., EC setting, not ABC Preschool, Headstart or Cooperative Program or ECSE setting, not center-based or integrated ECSE (Reverse mainstream, etc.) 

In the “Extent of Participation in Regular Education” Section, the IEP must indicate whether or not all of the child’s special education and related services are provided with non-disabled peers in a regular education setting. If the answer is “no”, then there must be a statement of the extent that the child will not receive his special education and related services with non-disabled peers and why integration with non –disabled peers in a regular education setting is not appropriate for this student.   

In the “Placement Considerations and Decisions” section on the IEP, the LEA must document which placement options were considered and the box for Early Childhood setting must always be checked under options considered so that it will be clear that integration with non-disabled peers in a regular education setting was considered.

 


 

6. For students who receive all or part of their services in a district center-based program, if the district chooses to operate its ECSE program as a cooperative program with other preschool programs such as Title I, MPP, or district-funded preschool, how does this affect placement and documentation of services on the IEP for an ECSE child?  

Districts are encouraged to look at all possible ways in which they can develop both effective and efficient programs to provide educational services to young children.  In the case where a district has established cooperative Early Childhood programs which serve both disabled and non-disabled children (i.e., Title I/ECSE), the same considerations and documentation on the IEPs of children with disabilities as was discussed in Questions 3.2 & 3.5 above would apply.   

When you document the extent of participation in regular education sections of the IEP, you are only addressing the period of the time the child received special education and related services-not the entire period of time the child might happen to be in an Early Childhood setting. Again, as in the answer to question 3.4, the team needs to carefully consider what special education, related services, supplementary aids and services modifications and adjustments, supports to school personnel are necessary to implement the IEP. (Over and above the instruction provided to all students in the class). 

If the child receives all his special education and related service in the cooperative Early Childhood classroom (not pull out), the placement is Early Childhood setting. If some of the special education, related services or supplementary aids and services are provided through pull-out and some are provided in the class room, the placement is part-time Early Childhood/part-time Early Childhood Special Education and the IEP must show documentation for the extent of and reason for the pull out services. 

It is important to remember that placement decisions are driven by the needs of the individual child as determined by the IEP and are not based upon how the district has chosen to administer their Early Childhood programs. State and federal regulations require that a range of placement options be available to provide for the Least Restrictive Environment needs of each child. 

For more information on effective instructional practices and funding of programs for children with disabilities, contact the Division of Special Education,

Effective Practices Section (573-751- 0187 or webreplyspeep@dese.mo.gov or the Funds Management sections at 573-751-0622 or webreplyspefm@dese.mo.gov.  For more information regarding documentation of placement for an ECSE child, contact the Compliance Section at 573-751-0699 or webreplyspeco@dese.mo.gov.

 


 

7. What do we do when a parent has enrolled their child in a preschool or daycare (Early Childhood setting), the IEP team has determined that the child’s special education and related services will be provided in that Early Childhood setting and then the parent decides to remove the child from the preschool/daycare? 

The district would need to locate another integrated (Early Childhood) setting where the services could be provided.

 


 

8. Where/how do you document regular education minutes on the IEP?

See the answer to Question 5 above. State and federal regulations no longer require that regular education minutes be documented on the IEP.  The extent of participation in regular education is now documented by indicating if the child will receive all of his special education services with non-disabled peers in a regular education setting. If not, documentation must show the extent of time the special education will not be provided in a regular education setting and the reasons why.

 


 

9. If an ECSE teacher is monitoring a child in a regular preschool, and the service is consultative, would the minutes be listed as 0?

NO.  Consultative services would be noted as follows: 

Consultation can be the special education service, if that is the only special education service provided.  

Sometimes, a student's specialized instruction can come from the regular education teacher who receives assistance through consultation from a special educator in order to provide the modifications, accommodations, or adaptation of the content, methodology, or delivery of instruction required in the student's IEP.  While the consultation time would not be direct services to the student, the IEP minutes for services would reflect the minutes in the instructional program directed by the IEP.  For example, the goals are addressed during sharing time and the student's IEP directs the time during that activity, then the minutes on the IEP for special education instruction will equal the minutes for sharing time or the portion of sharing time required to address the goal(s).  Additional services provided as consultation to the teacher and/or the student by the special educator would also be listed and designated as consultation for "X" number of minutes.  The minutes of services are not always direct instruction by a special educator.   

When consultation is not the only special education service, it is generally listed as supplementary aids and services. The regulations require that the amount of time, the frequency, the duration and the location be listed for supplementary aids and services.

 


 

10. Do students who have met ECSE eligibility criteria in the past now require a reevaluation to determine eligibility for YCDD or another categorical eligibility?

No.

 


 

11. How are children who have previously been identified under the ECSE criteria reported to DESE for childcount purposes?

You may find the instructions for doing this on the web at dese.mo.gov/divspeced/DataCoord/
specialeducationcategoriesold&new.htm

 


 

12. Can a child go to kindergarten with a YCDD diagnosis?

It depends. If a district has adopted the policy to identify 3 to pre-K 5 year olds using the YCDD category and has also chosen to allow the continuation of that criteria for Kindergarten-age eligible children (age 5 by August 1), then for any children previously identified as ECSE/YCDD, the IEP team can choose to continue that non-categorical label until they are first-grade age eligible (age 6 by August 1).  It should be noted that, whatever the categorical label, once the child turns Kindergarten age eligible, ECSE grant funds may not be used to pay for the child’s services.

 


 

13. Can a kindergarten child receive services in ECSE?

Yes. If a child has been identified and served with ECSE services previously, the IEP team can choose to continue to provide ECSE services during the kindergarten year.  However, as noted in Question 3 above, ECSE grant funds may not be used to pay for this placement.  This is not a change from previous regulation. IEP teams should carefully consider the issue of number of hours in an ECSE placement versus the number of hours a child in kindergarten in their district receives (half-day or full-day kindergartens). The IEP needs to document the appropriate child-related reason, if the hours are less. IEP teams also need to carefully review the issue of LRE in making the decision to continue another year of ECSE service, which typically means the kindergarten-aged child will remain among preschool-aged children.  This may be appropriate, but the IEP team needs to carefully consider whether or not this is the LRE based upon all of the child’s educational needs.

 


 

14. When social/emotional behavior is the only area for delay, is a licensed psychologist still required?

NO.  Professional judgment is sufficient to identify a delay. 

 


 

15. Are sensory issues considered under physical or adaptive?

For children with sensory disabilities, the team would have some options.  If their district policy allowed them to use all of the disability categories for determination of eligibility, then they could determine the child eligible under Visual Impairment/Blindness or Hearing Impairment/Deafness.  If the district’s policy is to only use the YCDD category for 3, 4 and pre-k 5 year olds, then the team would need to look at how the sensory impairment affects the child’s educational progress in each of the areas covered under YCDD—Cognitive, Adaptive, Social/Emotional, Communication, Physical.

 


 

16. How is the communication area of delay interpreted?

If a district allows both a YCDD and a categorical diagnosis, the eligibility determination team has the option of determining the student eligible under YCDD, or the team can consider the categorical areas of language impairment, sound system disorder, voice, or fluency. 

When considering Language Impairment, the criteria is 2.0 standard deviations below peers for that age group (refer to 1500 - Language Impairment, in the Compliance Standards & Indicators Manual). In this case, receptive and expressive language can be looked at separately and 2.0 standard deviations in either area would qualify the child as eligible. The evaluation report must document the results of two standardized assessments that measure the same areas of language. 

If the team is using YCDD as the only option then the team must substantiate a communication delay by assessing all the areas of communication as they relate to the child’s educational needs. When looking at categorical eligibility for language delays, two assessments measuring the same area of language are not needed, but delays must be documented overall (expressive and receptive). Sound system (1.5) and language (1.5) do not count as two separate areas when considering a YCDD diagnosis.  However, sound system can qualify as a stand-alone delay for YCDD if the child’s sound production is outside the limits of normal development as established for same age peers. 

To use speech-sound system disorder, voice, or fluency either as YCDD delays or as categorical area, use the criteria in 1600 - Sound System Disorder, 800 - Speech/Voice, 1700 - Speech/Fluency.

 


 

17. Are we required to test gross motor if the child only has fine motor concerns?

The Missouri State Plan now uses terminology consistent with language in the federal regulations. As a result, the former fine/gross motor area is now referred to as the physical area. Eligibility determination needs to focus on the overall physical development for the preschool child, particularly as it relates to the child’s educational needs. The delays in motor refer to an overall motor score of 2 standard deviations.  Keep in mind that, even though the child may not qualify for YCDD in the motor (physical) area, OT and PT can be provided as related services if the child is determined eligible based on another area of development and the IEP determines OT or PT is necessary for the child to benefit from special education.

 


 

18. If a student has a 1.5 SD in fine motor and a 1.5 SD in language, do they qualify?

No. The motor area must be 1.5 overall with both fine and gross motor and they must have a 1.5 SD in communication.

 


 

19. Will the state schools require a categorical diagnosis to accept students?

No.  The State Schools for the Severely Handicapped (SSSH) will be looking for evidence that the child meets the cognitive requirement and that the child needs support across all life areas and whether there is a justification for a separate school placement.  (See Section XI in the Missouri State Plan for Implementing Part B).

 


 

20. For First Steps students, do we have to follow the 30-day timeline between diagnosis and IEP if the evaluation is completed well in advance of the third birthday?

It depends.  The regulations require that, for children who are being served in the Part C system (First Steps), by the time the child is 2 years, 6 months of age, with the parent’s permission, the local school district be notified and invited to attend a transition IFSP meeting and that an IEP be in place to allow for the provision of services for an eligible child no later than their third birthday.  Exceptions to this occur when the district was not made aware of the child in sufficient time to complete an evaluation and develop the IEP or when a child’s third birthday falls during a normal vacation period for the school.   

 For children whose birthdays are May through August, their parent may elect for them to stay in First Steps until local districts begin operation in the fall. Students whose birthdays are in April can either stay in First Steps or begin services in Part B in their local district.  In both of these cases, the district must determine the child’s eligibility in the Part B system in order for the child to be able to continue with Part C services. According to the Office of Special Education Programs, an IEP must be developed within 30 days following a child’s determination of eligibility, except in the cases noted above where the child’s parents, because of the month in which their birthday falls, elects for them to remain in First Steps under an IFSP, the IEP can be developed any time prior to the beginning of the school year in which the child transitions to Part B services. For more information on transition of children from Part C to Part B, see the Missouri State Plan for either Part B or Part C and the Special Education Compliance Program Review Standards and Indicators Manual.

 


 

21. Is a regular education teacher required at the initial IEP for children eligible for ECSE services (even speech only)?

Yes.  A regular education teacher must participate in the initial IEP meeting for all eligible children, including those eligible for ECSE, even if the child is not already participating in an age appropriate program. This avoids pre-determination of placement.

 


 

22. Who can serve as the regular education teacher for a child who is eligible for ECSE?

For preschool children, the regular education teacher can be

  • a Title 1 preschool teacher

  • a public school preschool teacher

  • a community preschool teacher/childcare teacher

  • an integrated ECSE teacher

  • a Head Start teacher

  • Title1/ECSE cooperative teachers

  • ECSE teachers who also hold an EC (PK-3) certificate

  • Kindergarten teachers.

 


 

23. Who determines who will serve as the regular education teacher in the child’s IEP?

The public agency must determine the most appropriate person to serve as the regular education teacher on each child’s IEP.   

When applicable, the regular education teacher participating in a child’s IEP meeting should be the teacher who is, or may be, responsible for implementing the IEP, so that the teacher can participate in discussions about how best to teach the child.

 


 

24. What is the role of the regular education teacher in the IEP meeting?

The regular education teacher of a child with a disability, as a member of the IEP team, must, to the extent appropriate, participate in the development, review, and revision of the child’s IEP, including assisting in the determination of:

  1. appropriate positive behavioral interventions and strategies for the child, and

  2. supplementary aids and services, program modifications or supports for school personnel that will be provided for the child.

 


 

25. Does a regular education teacher have to be present for every IEP meeting?

No, with the exception of the initial IEP meeting as indicated in Question 3.23 above.  Whether or not a regular education teacher must attend all or any part of an IEP meeting must be determined on a case-by-case basis by the public agency, the parents, and other members of the IEP team.  The decision must be based on a variety of factors. 

Thus, while a regular education teacher is a member of the IEP team, the teacher may not (depending on the child’s needs and the purpose of the specific IEP meeting) be required to:

  •  Participate in all decisions made as part of the meeting

  •  Be present throughout the entire meeting, or

  •  Attend every meeting.

For a preschool child, a regular education teacher must participate in discussions of appropriate preschool activities to ensure the child’s involvement and progress in appropriate preschool activities and what accommodations/modification would need to be provided for both the child and for the child’s adult caregivers to enable the child to participate in the regular education environment (early childhood setting). However, it may not be necessary for the regular education teacher to participate in a meeting or part of a meeting where the team is determining the extent of a particular related service that would be necessary for the child, unless the regular education teacher would have some responsibility for assisting in the implementation of the related services.

 


 

26. If the IEP team has determined that the regular education teacher does not need to be present at an IEP meeting, must that be documented and how/where would that be done?

Yes, the team’s decision must be documented. This could be done in a number of ways.  It could be indicated both on the IEP meeting notification in the “participants invited to attend” section and also on the IEP in the section where the meeting participants are listed.  The documentation would read something like “The IEP team determined that participation of the regular education teacher was not necessary for this IEP meeting.”  Documentation could also be in IEP meeting notes, in a parent contact log, etc. 

 


 

27. What is the School Entry Assessment Profile (SEAP) and is ECSE required to complete it?

No, ECSE staff are not required to complete the SEAP. 

The School Entry Assessment Profile (SEAP) was developed as part of the work of Governor Carnahan’s Show Me Results Early Childhood Education Interagency Team.  The SEAP is a comprehensive effort to gather information on the school-readiness of children after they have entered kindergarten in Missouri public schools.  Policy makers use the results of each year’s study to improve educational, social, and health services for young children and their families. 

A random selection of 10% of kindergartens is made. Selected kindergarten teachers must agree to a one-day training.  The SEAP involves a 65-question survey that each teacher completes on each child about 6 weeks after the school year begins.  Parents also must complete a survey.   

These items reflect important entry-level skills in knowledge, behaviors or disposition in seven (7) areas of development. These areas are: symbolic development, communication, mathematical/physical knowledge, working with others, learning to learn, physical development and conventional knowledge.  

As the purpose of the SEAP is to assist statewide decision-making, no participating schools receive results, other than the statewide report.  The reader can find more information regarding the SEAP at: http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/fedprog/earlychild/seap.pdf

 


 

28. If districts are not required to administer the SEAP, why does the first performance goal in the Missouri State Plan include SEAP results?

The SEAP was developed as a way to measure readiness of all children in Kindergarten.  The Division elected to use participation in the SEAP as a way to compare the readiness of children with disabilities with that of children without disabilities.  It is a way to measure improvement in skills over time.

 


 

29. What can ECSE staff do to increase these results for young children with disabilities?

The first place to start is to examine the practices, curriculum, appropriate goals and objectives/benchmarks, etc. with regard to the seven (7) areas of development as listed in Question 3.29.  ECSE staff needs to begin examining how their instructional practices can improve student outcomes on the SEAP and other elementary experiences.

 


 

30. What about collaborative efforts with Head Start?

Collaborative efforts between ECSE staff and Head Start staff enhance all children’s readiness to move to their elementary years. When ECSE staff provide service directly to children with disabilities in Head Start and join forces on Professional development activities, all children gain.

 


 

31. Why were the ECSE technical assistance bulletins pulled from the WEB?

Four Show Me How TA documents were pulled from the CISE Web site during the fall of 2001 because each included outdated information that has not been updated.  These document titles were:
          “Helping children and families transition into ECSE” (Feb-97),
          “Reevaluation: ECSE to KG” (May-97),
          “Understanding early childhood LRE requirements” (Feb.-97), and
          “Another ECSE Service Delivery Model Choice” (February 2000). 
Most of the changes needed in these documents are due to the 1997 IDEA re-authorization and changes in the Missouri State Plan that took effect on October 1, 2001.

 


 

32. Will DESE be developing a new ECSE brochure?

Yes, the ECSE tri-fold brochure is in the process of being updated.  When the updates are completed the field will be notified of how they can obtain copies of the revised brochure.

 


 

33. Does the Division have plans to update the Show Me How II manual?

No, the Division does not have plans to update the Show Me How II Manual.  Rather, ECSE staff are encouraged to watch for the new technical assistance document series entitled "ECSE Practices."  Each "ECSE Practices" document will address a current issue in providing appropriate special education and related services for children eligible for ECSE services.  The information will clarify a variety of topics for professionals and paraprofessionals in the ECSE field.  

Due to the changing nature of special education topics, the delay in approving/printing manuals, and the technological opportunities now available, these issues will be available exclusively on the WEB at http://dese.mo.gov/divspeced/EffectivePractices/
ECSEpage.html
under Related Links, ECSE Practices.

 


 

34. How do I obtain information from DESE regarding ECSE as well as other special education topics (data collection, funding, etc.)?

The Division distributes critical information in a number of ways, but most often through SELS (Special Education Listserv) messages.  Each district has identified one individual to receive messages through SELS.  It is then up to that individual to distribute the messages to others in the district on a “need to know” basis.  SELS messages are also archived on the Division’s website and can be accessed by anyone with an interest by going to http://dese.mo.gov/divspeced/Administration/
ListServPostings/LSPostings.html

You can reach DESE staff at the following phone numbers
Compliance 573-751-0699 or webreplyspeco@dese.mo.gov
Effective Practices 573-751-0187 or webreplyspeep@dese.mo.gov
Funds Management 573-751-0622 or webreplyspefm@dese.mo.gov
Data Coordination 573-526-0299 or webreplyspedc@dese.mo.gov

Information is also available on the DESE web site


 

How Do I Find?