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Vol. 47, No. 12

March 5, 2013

Missouri Principal One of '20 to Watch' for Improving Education through Technology

Educator recognized by National School Boards Association

A St. Louis area middle school principal has received national recognition for his work to increase technology in the classroom to boost student learning and professional development for educators.

Dr. Robert Dillon, principal at the Maplewood Richmond Heights Middle School, was selected by the National School Boards Association as one of "20 to Watch" for the 2012-2013 school year.

"Technology use at our school has truly unleashed new ways of learning," Dillon said. "It is essential for school leaders to build and develop their professional learning network and culture so that all members of the community are learning on a continuous basis."

Dillon will be honored at the CoSN (Consortium for School Networking) conference in March and at the National School Boards Association annual conference in April. This year's "20 to Watch" honorees include classroom teachers, technology directors, superintendents and the director of an international technology organization.

"Congratulations to Dr. Dillon for his use of technology to improve student learning as well as the effectiveness of educators at his school," said Commissioner of Education Chris L. Nicastro. "The use of technology in instruction is key to preparing students for success in college and a career."

Dillon has been an educator in Missouri for the past 17 years. Prior to joining the staff at Maplewood Richmond Heights Middle School, he was an English and journalism teacher at Windsor High School and Fort Zumwalt South High School and a school leader in the Fort Zumwalt and Kirkwood school districts.

The "20 to Watch" program was established in 2006 as part of the National School Boards Association 20th anniversary celebration. The program identifies emerging leaders in education technology who have the potential to impact the field for the next 20 years. Since that time, the organization has recognized 140 educators nationwide for their work to advance the use of technology in education.