UNIT OVERVIEW

This reading-writing unit focuses on the development of a nonfiction animal picture book. The reading and writing activities in this unit provide opportunities for students to read for a variety of purposes, to investigate or research topics and to compose a picture book using the writing process. Lessons should occur simultaneously in an effort to scaffold students’ learning and provide opportunities to build background knowledge to become proficient readers and writers.

 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

§         What processes do authors use in researching topics?

§         How can I gather essential information and apply it in my own writing?

 

UNIT PLAN

This unit consists of a series of 10 lessons leading up to the completion of a nonfiction animal picture book by each student.

 

Lesson One

What is a nonfiction picture book anyway?

§         Sources of Literature:  None

§         Supplies:  Fiction books, variety of nonfiction/animal picture books, touchstone text 1, chart paper, writer’s notebook/pencils

§         Handouts:  None

§         Formative assessment:  provided

Lesson Two

Compare and contrast

§         Sources of Literature: None

§         Supplies: Touchstone text 2, anchor chart, chart paper, writer’s notebook/pencils

§         Handouts: Venn diagram, scoring guide for Venn diagram

§         Formative assessment:  provided

Lesson Three

Topic choice begins

§         Sources of Literature: None

§         Supplies: Large group Venn diagram on chart paper or whiteboard, touchstone text 3, writer’s notebook/pencils

§         Handouts:  None

§         Formative assessment:  provided

Lesson Four

Topic choice deepens/keywords/research

§         Sources of Literature:

§         Supplies:  Computers, chart paper, linking word chart, writer’s notebook/pencils

§         Handouts:  Linking word chart

§         Formative assessment:  provided

Lesson Five

Research

§         Sources of Literature: None

§         Supplies:  Computers, writing folders, linking word chart, writer’s notebook/pencils

§         Handouts:  Linking word chart from previous day’s lesson

§         Formative assessment:  provided

Lesson Six

The writing process

§         Sources of Literature:  None

§         Supplies:  Research template, research articles, pencils, highlighters, sticky notes

§         Handouts:  Research template

§         Formative Assessment: provided

Lesson Seven

The writing process continues

§         Sources of Literature: None

§         Supplies: Rough draft template, pencils, research template, research articles

§         Handouts: Rough draft template, research template

§         Formative Assessment: provided

Lesson Eight

The writing process continues (revising and editing)

§         Sources of Literature: None

§         Supplies:  Rough draft template, pencils, research articles, scoring guide, revising checklist, editing checklist

§         Handouts: Revising guide, editing guide

§         Formative Assessment: provided

Lesson Nine

Giving credit and final copy

§         Sources of Literature:  None

§         Supplies:  Rough draft template/pencils, final copy paper, research articles, crayons or color pencils

§         Handouts: Final copy paper (stapled copy resembling a book)

§         Formative Assessment: provided

Lesson Ten

Author Share

§         Sources of Literature: None

§         Supplies: Nonfiction picture books, author share checklist, animal reports scoring guide

§         Handouts:  Author share checklist

§         Formative Assessment: provided

 

GRADE-LEVEL EXPECTATION CONTINUUM

TARGETED LEARNING represents the specific Grade-Level Expectations (GLEs) that are taught and assessed in this unit.  Student mastery of these skills is expected at this grade level.  PREVIOUS LEARNING indicates student’s probable beginning skill level.  FUTURE LEARNING provides the “next step” for instruction or student application of communication arts skills and concepts.

 

PREVIOUS LEARNING

 

TARGETED LEARNING

FUTURE LEARNING

 

Use details for text to ask questions to clarify understanding, identify main ideas and provide support, retell sequence of events , and make basic inferences about problems and solutions.

 

 

R3C  Use details from text to answer questions, retell main idea and important details, organize a sequence of events, draw conclusions, compare and contrast texts, identify author’s purpose for writing text, and make inferences about problem and solutions.

 

 

Use details from text to retell main ideas, organize a sequence of events, identify cause and effect, draw conclusions, compare and contrast texts, make predictions, make inferences, distinguish between fact and opinion, identify and explain author’s purpose, and make inferences about problems and solutions.

 

 

Formulate key words and questions, with assistance to locate resources of interest.

 

 

IL1  Formulate key words and

       questions to investigate topics

 

 

Formulate and research keywords and questions to establish a focus and purpose for inquiry.

Locate information on keywords and questions in provided resources, with assistance.

 

IL1 Locate information on keywords in provided resources.

Locate and use various resources to find information on keywords and questions.

 

 

Give credit, through discussion, for others’ ideas, images, and information. 

IL1  Informally give credit for others’   ideas, images, and information found in various resources.

Informally give credit for others’ ideas, images, and information found in various resources.

Follow a writing process to utilize a simple graphic organizer in prewriting, generate a draft, reread and revise work (with or without assistance), edit and proofread for capitalization and ending punctuation, and publish writing with assistance.

W1A  Follow a writing process to independently use a simple graphic organizer in pre-writing, generate a draft, routinely edit and proofread for capitalization and ending punctuation, and independently publish writing

Follow a writing process to independently use a simple graphic organizer in prewriting, generate a draft, routinely revise, edit and proofread, and independently publish writing.

 

SHOW-ME STANDARDS ALIGNMENT

Goal 1:  Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to gather, analyze and apply information and ideas.

               

1.2           Conduct research to answer questions and evaluate information and ideas

1.5                 discover and evaluate patterns and relationships in information, ideas and structures

1.6                 evaluate the accuracy of information and the reliability of its sources

1.7                 organize data, information and ideas into useful forms (including charts, graphs, outlines) for analysis or presentation

 

Goal 2:   Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to communicate effectively within and beyond the classroom.

 

2.1                 plan and make written, oral and visual presentations for a variety of purposes and audiences

2.2                 review and revise communications to improve accuracy and clarity

§         exchange information, questions, and ideas regarding works of the arts, humanities and sciences

 

   Goal 3   The student will recognize and solve problems

                3.5           reason inductively from a set of specific facts and deductively from general premises

 

 

Teacher Reflection

 

  1. Did some touchstone texts work better than others? If so, which one and why?  How did having touchstone texts as a representation benefit the students?
  1. Did the students show complete understanding of the difference between fiction and nonfiction texts?
  1. Did the students grasp the idea of using key word searches in effort to expand their research efforts? Can the students initiate their own keyword searches regardless of the topic?
  1. What parts of the information gathering process was difficult? How would you tweak them in the future?
  1. Which parts of the writing process were challenging or unclear to students?
  1. Were students proud of their finished products?