UNIT OVERVIEW

This unit consists of eight lessons that focus on fiction and nonfiction text.  The central theme of this unit is to help children understand the components of fiction compared to nonfiction by reading The Very Hungry Caterpillar and nonfiction texts on caterpillars and butterflies. This unit could focus on any topic that interests children such as tadpoles and frogs by substituting the books used in each lesson. This unit includes eight lessons that can be implemented in a two-week period.

 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

What are the characteristics of fiction?

What are the characteristics of nonfiction?

 

UNIT PLAN

 

Lesson One

Read-Aloud from a Fiction Text

§         Literature:  The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle or Clara Caterpillar by Pamela Duncan Edwards or similar text

§         Supplies: None

§         Handouts:  None

§         Formative Assessment:  provided

Lesson Two

Using a Story Map to Identify Story Elements

§           Literature:  The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle or Clara Caterpillar by Pamela Duncan Edwards or similar text

§            Supplies:  Chart paper

§         Handouts:  Story map

§         Formative Assessment:  provided

Lesson Three

What is Nonfiction?

§         Literature:  Butterfly by Susan Canizares or From Caterpillar to Butterfly by Deborah Heiligman

§         Supplies:  None

§         Handouts:   None

§         Formative Assessment:  provided

Lesson Four

Using a Venn Diagram to Compare Two Texts

§         Literature:  The Very Hungry Caterpillar or Clara Caterpillar by Pamela Duncan Edwards or similar text

§         Supplies:  A copy of Butterfly by Susan Canizares or From Caterpillar to Butterfly by Deborah Heiligman (or any non-fiction book on butterflies), chart paper

§         HandoutsVenn diagram

§         Formative Assessment:  provided

Lesson Five

Exploring Nonfiction Texts

§         Literature:  None

§         Supplies: A variety of age-appropriate nonfiction texts on any subject (examples:  Newbridge Discovery Links, Creative Teaching Press Science Series, Wright Group or Scholastic) or ask the school media specialist for a selection

§         Handouts:  None

§         Formative Assessment: provided 

Lesson Six

Discovering Nonfiction Text Characteristics

§         Literature:  None

§         Supplies: Variety of nonfiction books used during Lesson Five;  chart paper

§         Handouts:  None

§         Formative Assessment: provided

Lesson Seven

Using a Venn Diagram to Compare Fiction and Nonfiction Characteristics

§         Literature:  None

§         Supplies: Story Map Chart of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Nonfiction Characteristics Chart from previous lesson, Venn diagram on chart paper, chart paper

§         Handouts:  Story map, Venn diagram

§         Formative Assessment: provided 

Lesson Eight

Deciding which is a Fiction Text or Nonfiction Text

§         Literature:  None

§         Supplies: A variety of age appropriate fiction and nonfiction books on any subject in baskets or crates,  anchor charts from previous lesson

§         Handouts:  Handout with headings Fiction, Nonfiction

§         Formative Assessment: provided 

 

 

GRADE-LEVEL EXPECTATIONS

 

 PREVIOUS LEARNING           TARGETED LEARNING                  FUTURE LEARNING

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

R1E:  Develop vocabulary by listening to and discussing unknown words in stories

Develop vocabulary through text, using base words and classroom resources.

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

R1F:  Develop and apply with assistance, pre-reading strategies to aid comprehension—access prior knowledge, preview text and pictures, and make general predictions

Develop and apply, with assistance, prereading strategies to comprehension—access prior knowledge, preview, predict with evidence, and set a purpose for reading with assistance.

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

R1H:  Develop and demonstrate with assistance, post-reading skills after reading or read-alouds to respond to text—questions to clarify, retell, illustrate, and re-enact stories

Develop and apply post-reading skills to respond to text—questions to clarify, retell, reflect, analyze, and draw conclusions.

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

R1I:  Identify connections, with assistance, between text ideas-similarities and differences in various real and make believe works (fiction and nonfiction) and text ideas and own experiences

Identify connections between text ideas-similarities and differences in various fiction and nonfiction works with assistance and text ideas and own experiences

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

 

R2A: Locate and apply information in title, pictures, and names of author and illustrator, with assistance

Locate and apply information in title, pictures and names of author and illustrator (R2A)

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

 

R2C: Uses details from text to identify story elements (main characters and problem)

Use details from text to identify

·         characters

·         problem

·         solutions

·         events in logical sequence

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

R3A: Develop an awareness that text and pictures provide information

Identify, and explain information in text, pictures, title and charts.

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

R3C: In response to text develop questions to clarify meaning, answer questions and discuss text, recognize important information, and identify supporting details

Uses details from text to ask questions to clarify understanding, recognize important information in text, identify main ideas, and identify supporting details

Applies early reading skills.  (MO Early Childhood Literacy Standards)

LS1A: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for simple directions with teacher assistance

Listen for enjoyment, for information, and for simple directions

 

 

SHOW-ME STANDARDS ALIGNMENT

Goal 1: The student will gather, analyze, and apply information and ideas.

1.5                 comprehend and evaluate written, visual, and oral presentations and works

1.6                 discover and evaluate patterns and relationships in information, ideas and structures

 

Goal 2: The student will communicate effectively within and beyond the classroom

2.4                 present perceptions and ideas regarding works of the arts, humanities, and sciences

 

Goal 3:  The student will recognize and solve problems.

3.1                 identify problems and define their scope and elements

 

CLASSROOM ARRANGEMENT

Careful consideration should be given to designing a classroom environment for kindergarten.  While no two teacher’s rooms will look exactly the same there are essential areas that need to be present in all classrooms for them to function efficiently.

 

These areas could include:

 

§         A large group area to accommodate whole-group instruction, including space arrangements so that students can gather around the teacher  (Many classrooms use a carpeted area for this purpose, a place where students can sit on the carpet as they gather around the teacher for a read-aloud, shared reading, interactive writing and mini-lessons.)

 

§         A small group area that will allow the teacher to meet with small groups of students for guided reading and literature discussions.

 

§         Centers that will allow students to engage in literacy learning experiences

 

§         A word wall that has been organized alphabetically and is located in the room so that children can see and manipulate the words easily (words will be added as children become familiar with them during the year)

 

§         A safe spot in which a child who is experiencing difficulty maintaining self control may go to regain composure

 

§         Places in the classroom for students to work independently.  Example: clipboards to work on the floor, tables in different parts of the classroom, etc.