LESSON SIX:  Discovering Nonfiction Text Characteristics

Students with a partner read one nonfiction text and list characteristics about nonfiction, with teacher assistance.

 

GRADE-LEVEL EXPECTATIONS

R3A:  Develop awareness that text and pictures provide information.

R3C:  In responds to text develop questions to clarify meaning, answer questions and discuss text, recognizes important information, and identify supporting details.

 

LESSON MATERIALS

Sources of Literature

§         None

Supplies

Handouts

Vocabulary

 

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Make mental notes of students who provide a characteristic of a nonfiction text, which will be recorded later in anecdotal notes and on a checklist of all unit objectives.  At the end of this lesson, record your observations of students who provided a characteristic of nonfiction text.  Notes from this observation and others can be used to rate each student using the checklist at the end of this unit.

 

LEARNING ACTIVITIES

 

1.        Gather in the read aloud area and gain attention of students by using a class signal.

 

2.        Students with a partner find one nonfiction book.  Tell students to do a quick browse through their book (five minutes)

 

Questions

for

Students

Tell me what you notice in the book.

What are some true things in this book?

 

 

3.        Use a class signal to gain attention

 

4.        Discuss what students notice about the nonfiction book that is different from The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

 

5.        Chart characteristics of nonfiction books such as table of contents, labels, photographs, captions, maps, index, glossary, etc.  Keep chart for next lesson.

 

Strategy

Think aloud - Define what the students are describing.  The students say, “The pictures have words by them.”   The teacher says, “Yes.  Those are called labels and that is an important characteristic of nonfiction books.”